• Course Syllabus

    AP Psychology, 2021 – 2022



    AP psychology is designed to introduce students to the scientific study of human behavior and experience and the major perspectives in the field.  Students will gain understanding of the methods used by the different perspectives to verify their theories, including their study of human and animal behavior.  The course is designed to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Examination in Psychology.

     

    Course Objectives:

    Students in this course will:

    1. gain an understanding of the nature of psychological diversity of human beings and the contribution biological, social, and cultural influences on behavior.
    2. develop appreciation of psychology as an academic discipline.
    3. recognize the application of psychology to students’ personal lives.
    4. demonstrate understanding of various methods of psychological inquiry.
    5. gather and interpret data using the empirical method of inquiry.
    6. demonstrate an understanding and respect for the ethical demands of research with humans and respect for the individual.
    7. demonstrate an understanding of the different theoretical approaches to understanding behavior.
    8. demonstrate a clear understanding of the major psychological perspectives (psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic).
    9. undertake one research study 
    10. demonstrate mastery of critical thinking and communication of ideas, especially in preparation for the demands if the AP exam.

     

    Course Outline:

    The AP psychology program is governed by a set of national standards created by the American Psychological Association.  These standards build on each other, so it is vital to understand what comes first in order to understand everything after it.

     

    Homework:  You will have a weekly “In Real Life” assignment that asks you to apply class topics to a real life event. You will also have periodic “authentic” assignments and vocab assignments.

     

    College Board: You are required to join the AP Classroom for this course through the College Board. Progress checks, quizzes, and tests will be assigned through this site.

     

    People: As we encounter important people in the history of psychology, keep track of them.  Create a three-column list. Label the columns PERSON/PERSPECTIVE, BEST KNOWN FOR, and APPLICATIONS.

     

    Mnemonics: Mnemonics are “memory tricks” that help you remember concepts and ideas.  I’ll be giving you a bunch of them. Keep track! Keep a Mnemonic list with the concept and the memory trick.  I’ll check these periodically.




    There are nine units required for this course be the College Board.  There will be a College Board test at the end of each unit. Aligning to your textbook, these units are:

     

    1. Scientific Foundations of Psychology
    1. The Need for Psychological Science

    Reading: Text pp. 18 - 29

    1.   Description (Case Study, Survey, Naturalistic Observation)

    Reading: Text, pp. 26 - 29

    1. Correlation

    Reading: pp. 30 - 36

    1. Experimentation

    Reading: Text, pp. 37 - 40

    1. Statistical Reasoning

    Reading: Text, pp. 42 – 43

    TEST: Experimental methods

    1.     Biological Bases of Behavior
    1. Neural Communication

    Reading: Text, pp. 56 - 61

    1. The Nervous System

    Reading: Text, pp. 65 - 67

    1. The Brain

    Reading: pp. 69 – 92

    1. The Endocrine System

        Reading: pp. 94 – 97

    1. Drugs and Consciousness

    Reading: Text, pp. 294 – 305

    1. Sleep and Dreams

    Reading: Text, pp. 269 - 284

    TEST: Biology and Behavior

     

    1.     Sensation and Perception
    1. Sensing The World

    Reading: Text, pp. 192 - 198

    1. Vision

    Reading: Text, pp. 199 - 211

    1. Hearing

          Reading: Text, pp. 212 - 218 

    1. The Other Senses

    Reading: Text, pp. 219 – 227

    1. Perceptual attention, illusions, organization

    Reading: Text, pp. 230 – 247

    1. Perceptual Interpretation

    Reading: Text, pp. 248 - 258



    1. Learning Theory
    1. Classical Conditioning

    Reading: Text, pp. 308 - 321

    1. Operant Conditioning

    Reading: Text, pp. 322 - 335

    1. Cognitive Learning/Observational Learning

    Reading: Text, pp. 336 – 337

    TEST: Learning Theory

     

    1. Cognitive Psychology
    1. Memory

    Reading: Text, Chapter 9

    1. Thinking and Language

    Reading: Text, Chapter 10

    1. The Origins on Intelligence Testing

    Reading: Text, pp. 418 - 421

    1. Intelligence

    Reading: Text, pp. 422 - 440

    1. Individual Differences

    Reading: Text: pp. 441 - 453

    1. Developmental Psychology
    2. Prenatal Development and the Newborn

    Reading: Text, pp. 134 - 139

    1. Infancy and Childhood

    Reading: Text, pp. 140 - 158

    1. Adolescence

    Reading: Text: pp. 159 - 159

    1. Adulthood

    Reading: Text: pp. 172 - 191

     

    1. Motivation, Emotion, and Personality
    1. Motivational Concepts

    Reading: Text, pp. 454 - 458

    1. Hunger

    Reading: Text, pp. 459 - 466

    1. Sexual Motivation

    Reading: Text: pp. 467 - 482

    1. The Need to Belong

    Reading: Text: pp. 483 – 497

    1. Emotion

          James-Lange, Cannon-Bard, Schachter-Singer

          Reading: Text, Chapter 13

    1.   Historical Perspectives on Personality

    Reading: Text, pp. 574 - 589

    1. Contemporary Research on Personality

    Reading: Text, pp. 590 - 617

    1. Clinical Psychology
    1. Perspectives on psychopathology (demonic possession to disease)

    Reading: Text, pp. 618 - 626

    1. Anxiety Disorders – When your hands are way too clean

    Reading: text, pp. 627 - 632

    1. Mood Disorders – It’s not the ups and downs, it’s the little jerks along the way

    Reading: Text, pp. 633 - 645

    1. Schizophrenia – Head voices holla’ back, girl!

    Reading: Text, pp. 646 – 652

    1. Personality Disorders – I crashed your car because I love you!

    Reading: Text, pp. 653 - 655

    1. Dissociative Disorders – Me, Myself, and Irene
    2. Somatoform Disorders – But my arm worked yesterday!
    3. Categorization, etc.
    4. Psychoanalysis, Behaviorist, Humanist, Cognitive, Group/Family Therapy

    Reading: Text, pp. 658 - 673

    1.   Evaluating Psychotherapy

    Reading: Text, pp. 674 - 684

    1. Biomedical Therapies

    Reading: Text: pp. 685 – 693

     

    1. Social Psychology
    2. Social Thinking

    Reading: Text, pp. 694 - 701

    B   Social Influence

    Reading: Text, pp. 702 - 713

    1. Social Relations

    Reading: Text: pp. 714 – 738

     

    Course Grading:

    Formative Assignments: 40%  

    Summative Assignments: 60% 

     

Last Modified on August 12, 2021